Enhancing Diversity, Equity & Inclusion in Your PTA

How do you improve your PTA’s diversity, equity and inclusion efforts in a meaningful way? Roger Minott Sherman Elementary PTA, in Fairfield, Conn., has a few valuable tips—they received a 2019 Jan Harp Domene Award for implementing several strategies to help their community embrace and value diverse perspectives. Discover a few of their keys to success below to get started in your community!

Make It Easier for Families to Be Involved

PTAs can diversify their membership by removing some of the barriers that prevent families from engaging. All families care about their child’s education, but some have more time and more resources to attend events and meetings. Instead of asking families to shift their schedules or miss work to attend, find ways to bring the information to them.

Sherman Elementary PTA found success by…

  • Shifting PTA meetings from midday to nighttime
  • Livestreaming PTA meetings for parents and caregivers who weren’t able attend in person
  • Providing more updates for families on the school website and via email blasts
  • Offering scholarships for PTA memberships and for admission to events and programs


Go Beyond One-Time Events About Diversity

Issues of diversity, equity and inclusion should be topics for ongoing discussion. While PTAs can begin to improve their diversity, equity and inclusion efforts with a specific event or series of events, like a multicultural night or a social justice book club, the ultimate goal should be to naturally embed these conversations and initiatives into everyday life.

Sherman Elementary PTA did just that. They began their diversity, equity and inclusion work by implementing a “Diversity Day.” The following year they expanded to hosting a “Diversity Week” and moving forward, they plan to have diversity programming throughout the year. Through this programming they will…

  • Ensure all children and their families are represented in the curriculum. Sherman Elementary PTA’s Diversity Week embedded activities related to different cultures, traditions and ethnicities throughout the curriculum, including in-class conversations, story time, art projects and more. As Sherman Elementary PTA works to expand their efforts beyond Diversity Week, they are collaborating with the librarian to ensure that children have access to diverse books all year round. They are also working to build a library display to include materials relevant to the variety of themes covered during diversity week including ability, gender, culture and more.
  • Create opportunities for cross-cultural exchange. Since their school’s student population is 86% white, it was essential to look beyond their school walls to help facilitate relationships between different races and cultures. Sherman Elementary PTA plans to establish a pen pal program with a neighboring school district to promote understanding between cultures.
  • Elevate diverse voices and stories to help the community understand new perspectives. At Sherman Elementary PTA meetings, volunteers presented on topics that were relevant to them—speaking to their own experiences around family diversity, differences in ability, and more. Moving forward, the PTA is eager to invite guests to speak at school-wide or grade-level assemblies to speak further on these and other issues.

Has your school, district or state PTA taken steps towards creating a more diverse, inclusive and equitable community? National PTA is now accepting applications for the 2020 Jan Harp Domene Diversity & Inclusion Award. Learn more and apply now!


Authored by Rebecca Bauer, National PTA Staff

New Year’s Resolutions to Help Keep Your Family Feeling Happy and Healthy

Practice healthy habits in the New Year to make 2020 the best year yet!

The time has come again for New Year’s resolutions. We often promise to lead healthier lives in the New Year, whether by eating clean or hitting the gym – but healthy habits include so much more! This year resolve to keep your family healthy by teaching and practicing healthy habits so you and your loved ones can spend less time recovering from illness, and more time enjoying what 2020 has to offer.

The National Parent Teacher Association and Lysol® want to ensure children and families stay healthy in 2020 with a few easy New Year’s resolutions:

  • Set an exercise routine: Regular physical activity can reduce the risk of chronic disease. The Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans recommend that adults get at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity or 75 minutes of vigorous-intensity physical activity each week. They also recommend that children and adolescents be active for at least 60 minutes every day.[i]
  • Meal prep on Sundays: Eating healthy helps your body to stay healthy. Try meal prepping for the week on Sundays to ensure you and your family have a balanced diet that includes fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and lean meats! [ii]
  • Start a cleaning and disinfecting routine: Clean and disinfect commonly touched surfaces at home, school and work a few times each week. Lysol Disinfecting Wipes® kill up to 99.9% of germs, including those that cause cold and flu, and are safe to use on most hard, non-porous surfaces, including electronics.
  • Give yourself time to rest: If you adopt all of these habits and you or your children still get sick, make sure to stay home from work or school to avoid passing illness to others.[iii]

Enter the Teach2Win Sweepstakes for the Chance to Win Lysol® Disinfecting Wipes for Your School!

Tell your school administrators and teachers! Lysol® is helping to make sure classrooms are stocked with product in 2020! Lysol® is selecting 250 winning teachers to receive 50 canisters of Lysol® Disinfecting Wipes for their school! To enter Teach2Win and for a chance to win, all teachers have to do is pledge to teach their students a Healthy Habits lesson in the classroom.

Visit http://www.Lysol.com/healthy-classroom to enter and for official rules. Entries must be submitted by February 27, 2020, and winners will be selected on March 1, 2020. No purchase is necessary to enter.


Author: Ferran Rousaud, Marketing Director for Lysol®

[i] https://www.cdc.gov/physicalactivity/walking/index.htm

[ii] https://www.cdc.gov/healthyweight/healthy_eating/index.html

[iii] CDC.gov. “Healthy Habits to Help Prevent Flu

 

Back the Future: a New Dedication to a Continued Mission

The PTA mission statement: It’s all about the kids, right? Well yes, and so much more.

The PTA mission is to make every child’s potential a reality by engaging and empowering families and communities to advocate for all children.

Now, if you’re not heavily involved in our association, this might not be the first thing you think of when someone mentions PTA. People sometimes praise us for the fundraising that we do for schools, but you’ll notice that our mission doesn’t say anything about fundraising. Of course we do raise funds, but we should spend those funds in ways that support our mission.

So what exactly does the PTA mission statement mean? Let’s break it down.

The beginning of the mission statement is essentially our vision statement: Every child’s potential is a reality. That’s our goal. That’s our purpose.

The remainder of the mission statement is how we achieve our vision. It has the action words of PTA: Engage. Empower. Advocate.

Let’s talk briefly about some of the key words and phrases in our mission statement.

Every Child Our mission statement begins and ends with the kids. This concept bookends our mission statement, and it is part of the tagline on the PTA logo (“Every Child. One Voice.”). When you first joined PTA, it was probably because you wanted to support your child and your school, and you might not have realized you were also joining your state PTA and National PTA and therefore supporting the millions of children across our nation. In PTA, every kid is one of ours, regardless of ethnicity, gender, language and culture, socioeconomic status, and so forth. So when PTA has advocated, throughout its history, for child labor laws, hot and healthy lunch programs, currently for school safety, and any other issue, it is for the benefit of every child. And when local PTAs provide programming, it should benefit every child at the school.

Family Engagement Our carnivals and dances and other events encourage family and community togetherness, and that is certainly important. But when it comes to family engagement, National PTA is challenging us to think even bigger and to truly focus on student success. National PTA now has a Center for Family Engagement to create truly transformative family engagement by using approaches that are inclusive, individualized, integrated and impactful. PTAs can help transform the relationships between families, schools, and community leaders in ways that make a difference for students. So think big!

Empower Our mission asks us to empower others so we can stand arm-in-arm to help children. We empower other PTA leaders through training and leadership development. We empower families by communicating about issues that affect kids and by suggesting ways to help. We empower our communities by forging partnerships to make our schools stronger. Through our combined efforts and voices, we make an impact on behalf of kids.

Community Here in Texas, our PTAs like to spell the word like this: CommYOUnity. YOU are an important part of your CommYOUnity. But YOU can’t do it alone. We become a powerful force when we work together in unity to achieve our mission. Think beyond the walls of your school, and welcome civic and business leaders, community volunteers, and others who support our mission into your PTA community. Strong schools and strong communities go hand-in-hand.

Advocacy This is such an important part of PTA, and it’s why you see us pushing membership. A robust membership gives us a strong voice as we advocate for issues that are important to make every child’s potential a reality.

When it comes to advocacy, understand that we advocate for or against issues, not candidates. We do not endorse any candidate, for any office, or any political party. We do encourage voting in an informed way.

The tagline in our logo is “Every Child. One Voice.” … and advocacy is the One Voice.

The PTA mission statement is so important because this is what guides us. Our mission should drive any significant PTA decision. Always come back to the mission. We need strong leaders in all PTA positions, and whatever your leadership role, you can help steer your PTA in the right direction by making sure your board’s priorities align with the PTA mission. When your PTA’s leaders understand the PTA mission, and they follow your bylaws and standing rules, and they are trained in the best practices of their roles, your PTA is on the path to success.


Julie Kluthe is communications chair for Flower Mound (Texas) High School PTSA and a member of the Texas PTA Leadership Committee. She has been a leader on the Lewisville ISD Council of PTAs where she created and led the Rising Stars Academy, a program to identify and develop PTA leadership in the Lewisville Independent School District.

Save the Date! Get Ready for LegCon 2020

I can hardly believe that the 2020 National PTA Legislative Conference (LegCon) is just a few months away. It has always been my favorite event because it is PTAs’ opportunity to use our voices to improve the lives of children and families.

Advocacy is at the core of our association’s mission and vision. Our legacy in advocacy started over 120 years ago when our founders organized over 2000 parents to speak on behalf of children and continued to lead the way in improving their lives. Through our members’ persistent commitment to advocacy, National PTA has played an integral role in landmark federal education legislation and policies. At this year’s #PTALegCon, we will continue to empower the nation towards making every child’s potential a reality.

This year our theme is PTA Takes Action for Kids! and we will do just that when PTA members from across the national descend on Capitol Hill to advocate for policies that support, advance and protect our nation’s youth.

This year’s LegCon is being held at the Westin Alexandria in Old Town—just a hop, skip and a jump from Washington D.C. We will have the opportunity to network with fellow PTA advocates, meet with policymakers and learn how to shape public policy on Capitol Hill and in your own state. Don’t miss this chance to expand your knowledge and have your voices heard!

As a constituent, your grassroots perspective is extremely valuable to elected officials and their staff. During our #PTALegCon Capitol Hill Day, Wednesday, March 11, you will be able to inform lawmakers about which federal programs are serving our children well and which ones are failing them. Federal policymakers work to improve the lives of children and families and they want to hear directly from the people they represent.

Never underestimate the power of your voice! We all want to improve education, and LegCon 2020 will be the perfect time to call upon the 116th Congress to take action. Let’s let them know how they can make a difference in the lives of all children.

Attending #PTALegCon is also about improving and sharpening your advocacy skills! Regardless of your level of advocacy knowledge, we will have something for everyone! Not only will you have the opportunity to hear from policy experts during our workshops, you will hear from your peers that are experts in diverse areas of advocacy. These experts will guide you through the policy landscape and equip you with the knowledge and tools necessary to effectively advocate on these issues.

You will leave better prepared to engage in policy discussions with lawmakers, advocates and members of your community. We are confident you will return to your home states feeling fully self-reliant and ready to speak for every child with one voice!

Lastly, we are beyond thrilled to announce our Keynote Speaker for the Advocacy Awards dinner is Rodney Robinsonthe 2019 National Teacher of the Year. He is a powerful, thoughtful and inspiring speaker and is sure to bring all of us to our feet!

Join us! Register here to attend the 2020 National PTA Legislative Conference


About the Author:

Yvonne Johnson is the Vice President of Advocacy, Chair of the Legislation Committee, and member of the board of directors for National PTA.

 

PTA Leader Helps School Step Outside Comfort Zone and Into Progress

Last week, I had the pleasure of meeting Daphne Callender, Fitness Instructor by day and PTA champion of Springfield Estates Elementary School (SEES) PTA in Springfield, VA, and her extraordinary school community in celebration of their 2019-2021 National PTA School of Excellence designation. The warm celebration with parents, staff and administrators included a delicious dinner, a decorated cake and the unveiling of their School of Excellence banner. As one of 19 PTAs in Virginia to earn the School of Excellence designation this year, Springfield Estates Elementary PTA had a great deal to be proud of. Through their year-long School of Excellence program, SEES PTA chose to focus on the inclusion and access to their ethnically, racially and socio-economically diverse community. As both a Title 1 neighborhood school and Advanced Academic Placement Center that pulls from eight different elementary schools, SEES PTA felt it was imperative to bring all members together to build community and celebrate their rich diversity.

Through their School of Excellence plan, SEES PTA took deliberative steps to make certain that all parents knew that they were invited to attend and participate in all PTA events, translating invitations into their five major languages: Spanish, Vietnamese, Chinese, Urdu, and Arabic.  These invitations were personally distributed to all cars in the Kiss-N-Ride line and sent home in students’ folders. They also asked their Spanish-speaking parent liaison and English as a Second Language teachers to encourage and welcome parent participation at all PTA events. The PTA hosted an international food potluck dinner where families shared dishes from their culture and, to further welcome families with differing socio-economic statuses, they secured scholarships and gift certificates with one of their after-school STEM programs. It is clear that Springfield Estates Elementary celebrates their diverse and culturally rich environment and fervently believes it enhances the educational experience of their students and their families alike. Here is what Daphne shared about her work in the School of Excellence program:

“The National PTA School of Excellence Award program enabled our PTA committee to recognize that although we had a strong PTA, there was room for more family engagement and to make sure that feeling of welcome extended to each and every family at our school. Upon receiving the first email, I gave it a little bit of thought but didn’t know if I wanted to add something else to my already full schedule.  When I received the email that it was the absolute last day to sign up, I decided to go for it.  I then created a team of people who could help me implement and execute a plan for more family engagement. I would highly recommend the National PTA School of Excellence program to other schools because it helps to provide a goal to work towards.  I believe it easy to get stuck in doing what’s always been done. The program gave our PTA a focus and we worked on it together as a team.”

Congratulations SEES PTA and thank you for being a leader in building family-school partnerships!


Amy Weinberg, Manager Programs & Partnerships at National PTA.

Visit PTA.org/Excellence to learn more about the School of Excellence program and how your PTA can earn the designation.

4 Key Facts on Meningococcal Disease that Parents Should Know During the Back-to-School Season

It’s the beginning of the school year and while students are settling into the classroom, many parents are working to keep their children on top of everything they need to be successful. With so much to do, it’s no wonder it can be overwhelming. Whether it’s high school or college, parents are trying to help get their teen prepared by purchasing pens and notebooks, bookbags and accessories, and even SAT guides and index cards. And, while those things are important, parents may not be aware two particularly crucial items for their school year—two separate vaccines to help protect adolescents and teens against meningococcal disease.

Teens and adolescents are one of the more at-risk populations given their phase of life. Because they can carry these bacteria in the back of the throat, innocent and typical behavior for teens such as sharing a drink or meal, or even a kiss with their significant other, could lead to the transmission of bacteria that cause this uncommon but serious disease.3 Below are key facts to help keep your teen healthy as you navigate the school year:

  • Meningococcal disease is an uncommon, but serious disease that can attack without warning.4,5 Meningococcal disease can lead to meningitis (inflammation of the protective membranes that cover the brain and spinal cord) and serious blood infections.5
  • It’s important for parents of adolescents and teens to be aware that there are two separate vaccines to help protect against different groups of meningococcal disease: one vaccine that helps protect against groups A, C, W and Y and a separate vaccine that helps protect against group B. These two vaccines are needed to help protect against the most common groups of meningococcal disease.8
  • Meningococcal group B (MenB) is an uncommon disease that accounted for nearly 69% of all U.S. meningococcal cases in 16- to 23-year-old adolescents and young adults in 2017.10 MenB can lead to death within 24 hours11,12 and in survivors may result in life-altering, significant long-term disabilities.8,11
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends adolescents receive their first dose of a MenACWY vaccine between ages 11 and 12 and a booster dose at age 16.12 The CDC also recommends that parents and their teens talk to their doctor or pharmacist about receiving a MenB vaccination series starting at age 16.10

If you’re a parent and have questions about how to help protect your adolescent or teen against meningococcal disease, including MenB, the first and best step you can take is to talk to your child’s health care provider. To learn more, please visit www.MeetMeningitis.com. This is sponsored in partnership with Pfizer.


 

[1] Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Meningococcal disease. Enhanced meningococcal disease surveillance report. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. https://www.cdc.gov/meningococcal/downloads/NCIRD-EMS-Report-2017.pdf. Accessed June 2019.

[2] Tully J, Viner RM, Coen FG, et al. Risk and protective factors for meningococcal disease in adolescents: matched cohort study. BMJ. 2006;232(7539):445-450.

[3] Poland GA. Prevention of meningococcal disease: current use of polysaccharide and conjugate vaccines. Clin Infect Dis. 2010;50:S45-S53.

[4] Serogroup B Meningococcal (MenB) VIS. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Website. https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/vis/vis-statements/mening-serogroup.html. Updated August 9, 2016. Accessed June 2019.

[5] Soeters H, McNamara L, Blain A, et al. University-Based Outbreaks of Meningococcal Disease Caused by Serogroup B, United States, 2013–2018. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/25/3/18-1574_article. Accessed June 2019.

[6] Walker, TY, et al. (2019). National, Regional, State, and Selected Local Area Vaccination Coverage Among Adolescents Aged 13–17 Years — United States, 2018. Accessed at https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/68/wr/pdfs/mm6833a2-H.pdf. MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. 68(33): 718-723.

[7] Enhanced meningococcal disease surveillance report, 2017. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. https://www.cdc.gov/meningococcal/downloads/NCIRD-EMS-Report-2017.pdf. Accessed June 2019.

[8] Meningococcal Vaccines for Preteens, Teens. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. http://www.cdc.gov/features/meningococcal/. Accessed June 2019.

[9] Thompson MJ, Ninis N, Perera R, et al. Clinical recognition of meningococcal disease in children and adolescents. Lancet. 2006;367(9508):397-403.

[10] Borg J, Christie D, Coen PG, Pooy R, Viner RM. Outcomes of meningococcal disease in adolescence: prospective, matched-cohort study. Pediatrics. 2009;123:e502-e509.

[11] Sabatini C, Bosis S, Semino M, Senatore L, Principi N, Esposito S. Clinical presentation of meningococcal disease in childhood. J Prev Med Hyg. 2012;53:116-119.

[12] Recommended Child and Adolescent Immunization Schedule for ages 18 years or younger. US Department of Health and Human Services. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/schedules/downloads/child/0-18yrs-child-combined-schedule.pdf. Accessed June 2019.

Did You Know It Takes Two?

With teenagers, there are certain things that come in non-negotiable pairs: a new driver’s license and extra insurance, a cell phone and social media, or headphones and music. And, while those things are important, parents may not be aware of one particularly crucial “pair”—two separate vaccines to help protect adolescents and teens against meningococcal disease more commonly referred to as meningitis.

Teens and adolescents are one of the more at-risk populations given their phase of life. Because they can carry these bacteria in the back of the throat, innocent and typical behavior for teens such as sharing a drink or meal, or even a kiss with their significant other, could lead to the transmission of bacteria that cause this uncommon but serious disease.3

It’s important for parents of adolescents and teens to be aware that there are two separate vaccines to help protect against different groups of meningococcal disease: one vaccine that helps protect against groups A, C, W and Y and a separate vaccine that helps protect against group B. These two vaccines are needed to help protect against the most common groups of meningococcal disease.8

Key facts about meningococcal disease:

  • Meningococcal disease is an uncommon, but serious disease that can attack without warning.4,5
  • Meningococcal disease can lead to meningitis (inflammation of the protective membranes that cover the brain and spinal cord) and serious blood infections.5
  • Meningococcal group B (MenB) accounted for nearly 69% of all U.S. meningococcal cases in 16- to 23-year-old adolescents and young adults in 2017.7
  • Meningococcal group B disease (MenB), although uncommon, can lead to death within 24 hours8,9 and in survivors may result in life-altering, significant long-term disabilities.10,11

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends adolescents receive their first dose of a MenACWY vaccine between ages 11 and 12 and a booster dose at age 16.12 The CDC also recommends that parents and their teens talk to their doctor or pharmacist about receiving a meningococcal group B disease (MenB) vaccination series starting at age 16.10

If you’re a parent and have questions about how to help protect your adolescent or teen against meningococcal disease, including MenB, the first and best step you can take is to talk to your child’s health care provider. To learn more, please visit www.MeetMeningitis.com. This is sponsored in partnership with Pfizer.


 

[1] Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Meningococcal disease. Enhanced meningococcal disease surveillance report. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. https://www.cdc.gov/meningococcal/downloads/NCIRD-EMS-Report-2017.pdf. Accessed June 2019.

[2] Tully J, Viner RM, Coen FG, et al. Risk and protective factors for meningococcal disease in adolescents: matched cohort study. BMJ. 2006;232(7539):445-450.

[3] Poland GA. Prevention of meningococcal disease: current use of polysaccharide and conjugate vaccines. Clin Infect Dis. 2010;50:S45-S53.

[4] Serogroup B Meningococcal (MenB) VIS. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Website. https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/vis/vis-statements/mening-serogroup.html. Updated August 9, 2016. Accessed June 2019.

[5] Soeters H, McNamara L, Blain A, et al. University-Based Outbreaks of Meningococcal Disease Caused by Serogroup B, United States, 2013–2018. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/25/3/18-1574_article. Accessed June 2019.

[6] Walker, TY, et al. (2019). National, Regional, State, and Selected Local Area Vaccination Coverage Among Adolescents Aged 13–17 Years — United States, 2018. Accessed at https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/68/wr/pdfs/mm6833a2-H.pdf. MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. 68(33): 718-723.

[7] Enhanced meningococcal disease surveillance report, 2017. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. https://www.cdc.gov/meningococcal/downloads/NCIRD-EMS-Report-2017.pdf. Accessed June 2019.

[8] Meningococcal Vaccines for Preteens, Teens. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. http://www.cdc.gov/features/meningococcal/. Accessed June 2019.

[9] Thompson MJ, Ninis N, Perera R, et al. Clinical recognition of meningococcal disease in children and adolescents. Lancet. 2006;367(9508):397-403.

[10] Borg J, Christie D, Coen PG, Pooy R, Viner RM. Outcomes of meningococcal disease in adolescence: prospective, matched-cohort study. Pediatrics. 2009;123:e502-e509.

[11] Sabatini C, Bosis S, Semino M, Senatore L, Principi N, Esposito S. Clinical presentation of meningococcal disease in childhood. J Prev Med Hyg. 2012;53:116-119.

[12] Recommended Child and Adolescent Immunization Schedule for ages 18 years or younger. US Department of Health and Human Services. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/schedules/downloads/child/0-18yrs-child-combined-schedule.pdf. Accessed June 2019.

5 Back-in-School Tips for Over-Stressed, Over-Stretched Sports Parents

There are many reasons to celebrate moms and dads this back-to-school season, not the least of which is their selfless commitment to contributing so much of their precious time and hard-earned money to their children’s after-school and weekend youth sports activities.

And let’s face it, parents of kids involved in sports have A LOT on their plate during the busy fall season. Driving to practices after school and games on Saturdays, washing seemingly endless amounts of dirty laundry, planning for the entire season calendar (sometimes for multiple kids of different ages across multiple sports), packing snacks and meal prepping. The list goes on.

Not surprisingly, as children participate in more and more organized team sports, both the time and the financial commitment that are needed from mom and dad have skyrocketed.

While both parents typically make an enormous commitment to seeing their child succeed on the field or court, there are some interesting differences between how moms and dads are involved in their children’s back-to-school athletic pursuits.

FlipGive–the team funding platform that has helped over 35,000 youth sports teams and clubs across North America raise $20 million–surveyed 1,000 American sports parents and learned some interesting insights.

  1. CUT DOWN ON BACK-IN-SCHOOL STRESS BY GETTING SPORTS CALENDARS ORGANIZED NOW
    Right off the bat, parents of kids who play on school sports teams said they were 33% more stressed about the start of the new school year than parents of kids who don’t play on school sports teams. One way to help relieve that stress? Treat your kid’s sports schedule like you do your work meetings and weekend social events, and use TeamSnap to add practices and games to your calendar and mobile device.
  1. LEARN THE ROPES: MEET SCHOOL COACHES & BUILD EARLY RELATIONSHIPS
    35% of dads and 11% of moms admit they’ve gotten into a heated argument at one of their child’s school-related sporting events– either with a referee, coach, or other parent. Pro tip: If you get to know somebody, you’re less likely to want to punch them in the face or threaten to egg their house because they made a bad call or they took your kid off the field for a much-needed rest.
  1. ESTABLISH SLEEPING SCHEDULES & ROUTINES NOW TO EASE THE TRANSITION
    For parents of kids who play school sports, the time commitment associated with their child’s sports involvement is the number one cause of stress when school sports season starts back up (40%). Cut down on this stress by setting aside ample time for you AND your kids to catch up on sleep when they aren’t scoring goals and hitting homers and you aren’t shuttling them around town from the field, to the court, to the rink.
  1. ENCOURAGE KIDS TO HAVE FUN & BE TEAM PLAYERS ON SCHOOL SPORTS TEAMS
    It turns out sports moms and dads have very different goals for their youngster’s athletic involvement. For moms, the top goal for their child is to have fun (38%). For sports dads, the top priority for their child is to learn teamwork and leadership skills (34%). With all of these goals in mind this back-to-school season, try and remember that a big part of youth sports is helping your child grow into a well-rounded, respectful adult who knows how to handle wins, losses, and adversity.
  1. PROPER MEAL-PREP & SNACKS ARE CRUCIAL FOR SPORTS PARENTS
    It’s no secret that young athletes are growing and usually hungry, and 95% of parents with kids who play school sports said it’s a top priority for them to ensure their kids have nutritional meals and snacks throughout their school day to maximize their endurance and performance. Some friendly advice–find some healthy, protein-packed snacks that your kids like, and stick with them! A big part of success on the field is routine, and the less your child has to worry about, the better.
  2. SEEK OUT CARPOOLS WITH THE MOST ON-THE-BALL SPORTS PARENTS

Fun fact: a relatively equal amount of sports moms (59%) and dads (58%) said they drive the classic sports parent minivan. FlipGive recommends setting up a back-to-school carpool with parents who have kids that play on the same team as your child in advance of the first day to cut down on last minute planning and to avoid the dreaded shame that comes with getting your child to practice late.

THE MOST BACK-TO-SCHOOL READY SPORTS PARENTS

Some school sports parents are more prepared for back-to-school season and school-year sports play than others. The top 5 states where sports parents are most back-to-school ready, according to a FlipGive survey of over 2,000 parents, are:

  1. Mississippi (72%)
  2. Texas (69%)
  3. Virginia (68%)
  4. Georgia (66%)
  5. Ohio (65%)

To learn more about how parents are helping their kids succeed outside of the classroom and on the sports field this back-to-school season, or behaving in school bleachers, please visit www.flipgive.com/.

 

Element of a Confident Parent – Looking for the Good

Originally posted on Confident Parents Confident Kids

Though the sunshine sparkles through the yellow leaves during these beautiful Fall days, there is less light in the morning and evening. And we’ve been doing this school thing for a few months now. We’ve poured it on and now we are slowing down a bit – tired. My husband and I noticed that some of the routines that used to run smoothly are in need of an update. In particular, we’ve noticed that our son leaves his dishes behind for someone else to take care of, whether it’s breakfast or dinner. He’s picked them up, cleaned them off and placed them in the dishwasher in the past. We know he can do it. But he’s forgetting regularly. And we began to remind him but realized we had down-shifted into nagging. When reminders happen day-after-day, then a parent knows that she’s entered the hamster wheel, a vicious cycle going nowhere. So the question becomes, “How does learning take place? How is change facilitated?”

We informally – Mom, Dad and E, our nine-year-old, sat around one night after dinner and brainstormed solutions. “The taking-in-of-the-dishes seems to be challenging. It’s hard to remember when you’ve got play you are eager to get to. What could help you remember?” I said and we started thinking off all kinds of ways to help him remember with E chiming in his ideas. “I could wear one of those rubber bracelets.” Or “I could not get dessert until my dishes are returned.” We talked about the possibilities of each and how they might work. And finally, he resolved that if we say simply “Dishes.” quietly when he’s asking to leave the table, that’s all the help he needs to remember. And it’s worked exceedingly well.

In addition, my husband and I resolved to be certain and notice when he did his routines without our reminders. So often, we play the “Gotcha!” game as parents. “You forgot this.” “You left that behind.” “You made a mess here.” And because we are so busy focused on the mistakes of life, we forget ourselves to point to the good even though we all tend to forget daily tasks. “Ooops, you are going to have to wear a day-old shirt because I forgot to get the laundry done last night.” is a common refrain of my own.

It doesn’t take long to recognize the good but it does take some presence of mind. We do have to pay attention to our kids not to catch them doing wrong but to catch them doing right. If kids are reinforced by recognizing their faults, they too will focus on their faults. And along with the fear of making mistakes (which often leads to more of the same), they will accumulate shame for their long list of missteps.

We can all use some reinforcing of the good. But as parents, we need help to remember. Habit changes can be tough for anyone. And looking for the good does not seem to come naturally to most of us problem-solvers who are ready to “fix” things. So how do we cultivate our own habit of looking for the good that our children do?

We need not shower them with praise. In fact, research shows that too much praise – or praise that is not specific – “Good job!” – or praise that is over-the-top, does not help reinforce positive behaviors. It doesn’t seem genuine and can actually de-motivate children.1 So in striving for authentic feedback that will provide a balanced view of children’s actions, here are some thoughts.

Step back and reflect.

Find a quiet moment to think about your feedback to family members. You might ask yourself the following questions. Consider these as they relate to each family member. Write your responses since the physical act of writing (by hand) will help solidify the thoughts in your brain. Conduct your own self-assessment so that you know how you can and want to improve.

  • What are typical daily comments I make in relation to _______________ (insert family members) behavior?
  • How many of those comments are about problems I see with others’ behaviors?
  • How many of those comments recognize positive contributions?
  • How frequently do I comment on that particular problem behavior? (twice a day, weekly?)
  • Does the behavior truly create a problem for the family? And if so, how can I facilitate a behavior change?

a.) Have I adequately modeled the behavior for my child so that I am certain he knows how to perform the task? Could he use a refresher in doing the task together with encouragement? Check out this article on interactive modeling for more.

b.) Or if he knows exactly how to do the task, can we hold a family meeting or talk just the two of us and brainstorm solutions on ways to solve the problem?

c. Can we create a plan for our newly revised routine? Formalize it by writing it down and posting it where your kids can see and be reminded by their plan they devised with you.

Set a goal.

Once you’ve identified not only what you don’t want to do but what habits you want to adopt, set a positive goal for yourself. What will you do to help yourself recognize the good?

Consider developmental milestones.

So often the behaviors that annoy us about children relate directly to the developmental milestones on which they are working. By the very nature of learning and achieving new levels of awareness and ability, they will be making mistakes. It’s a necessary part of how we all learn. So at this time when you are looking to make your own habit changes, read about your child’s age and stage and find out what they are working on. Then when they make mistakes, you’ll be able to recognize and connect it to their development. It will allow you greater empathy resulting in added patience and understanding. You’ll be ready to support their learning versus falling into the tendency to scold them for their mistakes. Check out the Parent Toolkit for development ages/stages. Download the free application that will send you updates on your specific child’s development.

Co-create a routine.

Since mornings were getting rough and I noticed the reminding was about to turn into a cycle of nagging, E and I worked on updating full-morning-routine-poster-2016his morning routine poster one day after school. We talked through specific times that were challenging to get through in the morning. “How are you going to remember to brush your teeth?” He enjoyed developing his routine poster. And yet again, it worked. Our mornings have gone smoothly ever since and I have been intentional about reinforcing his positive behaviors with comments like, “Woah, I didn’t say a word of a reminder this morning and we were out of the door on time. You completed all of your tasks and your backpack is ready.” Check out this video short on the morning routine if you need to revisit yours to help that time of day run smoothly.

Establish accountability.

How are you going to keep yourself accountable to the goal you’ve set? How are you going to remember to recognize positive behaviors? Sometimes, the most powerful accountability comes from those around us. So if you let family members know about the goal you are working toward, they can check in with you. Those small reminders can help support your habit change.

Though many believe that we are only hard-wired for self-centeredness and the good must be socialized into us, in fact, research confirms that we are born with both the capacity for self-centeredness but also, altruism and empathy.2 Our very survival is based on our ability to connect with others. Studies with babies have shown that even those new to the world will try and assist others – babies or adults – who are suffering and need help.3

If we view ourselves as here to “fix” our kids, our kids will feel as if they need fixing. But if we view our kids as learners – as inherently ready to help and do good – they will help and do good. And if we are able to regularly find and shine a light on their strengths and the many ways they contribute to our family lives, they will grow with an identity that is strong and resilient.

I was recently reminded of contributions my son makes to our lives that I tend to take for granted. My Mom came to celebrate her birthday. And her grandson made her smile and laugh nearly the entire time she was visiting. As she hugged me goodbye, she expressed how much she appreciated her grandson making her laugh and how rare it was for her to experience laughter daily in her own quiet household of two adults. I had been consumed with the chaos and busyness of all of my responsibilities that day. What an important reminder it was for me and a helpful wake-up call to recognize the significant contribution of my child. When he’s grown and moved out, it’s the laughter I will recall not the dirty dishes.


About the Author: Jennifer Miller is the author of Confident Parents, Confident Kids and a recent guest on the National PTA podcast, Notes from the Backpack.

References

1. Kohn, A. (1993). Punished by rewards; The trouble with gold stars, incentive plans, A’s, praise and other bribes. Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin Co.

2. Szalavitz, M. & Perry, B. (2010). Born for Love, Why Empathy is Essential and Endangered. NY: HarperCollins Publishers.

3. Keltner, D. (2009). Born to be Good, The Science of a Meaningful Life. NY: W.W. Norton and Company.

My Name is Meningitis

Hi, my name is meningitis and it’s nice to meet you. I think it’s time that I introduce myself, especially if you are the parent of an adolescent or teen. Let me tell you a little bit about myself and what I’ve been busy doing the past several years…

  • What am I? I am an uncommon but potentially deadly infection caused by the bacteria Neisseria meningitidis. There are five groups—A, B, C, W, and Y—that cause the majority of this disease and for which vaccines are available in the United States.[7] Specifically, group B or MenB accounted for 69% of all meningococcal disease cases in US adolescents and young adults in 2017.[1]
  • Who is most likely to meet me? Teens and adolescents are one of the more at-risk populations for meningococcal disease, given their phase of life and because they can carry these bacteria in the back of the throat.[2] Innocent actions such as sharing a drink, a meal, or even a kiss with their significant other are all typical behaviors for teens; however, these could lead to transmission of bacteria that cause this very serious disease.[2]
  • What else should you know? Meningococcal disease can attack without warning,[3],[4] and progress rapidly with early flu-like symptoms such as headache, nausea, and vomiting that may be difficult to distinguish from other more common infections.[2]

What have I been doing?

During the past several years—between 2011 and 2018—one of my groups, MenB has caused all outbreaks of meningococcal disease at US colleges.[5] You may have heard about me in the news from outbreaks on university campuses including Rutgers University, Oregon State University, and Princeton University.

How do you help protect your teen or adolescent against me?

Good question! There are two distinct vaccines that help protect against these different groups of meningococcal disease: one vaccine that helps protect against groups A, C, W and Y, and a second vaccine that helps protect against group B.[8] While parents may believe their teen is protected against meningococcal disease after receiving their MenACWY vaccination, it’s important that their teen also receive the separate vaccination to help protect against MenB. As of 2018 in the U.S., only 17.2% of 17-year-old adolescents had started a multi-dose MenB vaccination series.[6]

It’s critical for parents to be educated about meningococcal disease, including MenB, so you can recognize the risk factors, signs and symptoms—and even help prevent it. If you have questions about how to help protect your adolescent or teen against meningococcal disease, including MenB, the first and best step you can take is to talk to your child’s health care provider. To learn more, please visit www.MeetMeningitis.com where you can learn important information about me. This is sponsored in partnership with Pfizer.


[1] Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Meningococcal disease. Enhanced meningococcal disease surveillance report. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. https://www.cdc.gov/meningococcal/downloads/NCIRD-EMS-Report-2017.pdf. Accessed June 2019.

[2] Tully J, Viner RM, Coen FG, et al. Risk and protective factors for meningococcal disease in adolescents: matched cohort study. BMJ. 2006;232(7539):445-450.

[3] Poland GA. Prevention of meningococcal disease: current use of polysaccharide and conjugate vaccines. Clin Infect Dis. 2010;50:S45-S53.

[4] Serogroup B Meningococcal (MenB) VIS. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Website. https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/vis/vis-statements/mening-serogroup.html. Updated August 9, 2016. Accessed June 2019.

[5] Soeters H, McNamara L, Blain A, et al. University-Based Outbreaks of Meningococcal Disease Caused by Serogroup B, United States, 2013–2018. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/25/3/18-1574_article. Accessed June 2019.

[6] Walker, TY, et al. (2019). National, Regional, State, and Selected Local Area Vaccination Coverage Among Adolescents Aged 13–17 Years — United States, 2018. Accessed at https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/68/wr/pdfs/mm6833a2-H.pdf. MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. 68(33): 718-723.

[7] Enhanced meningococcal disease surveillance report, 2017. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. https://www.cdc.gov/meningococcal/downloads/NCIRD-EMS-Report-2017.pdf. Accessed June 2019.

[8] Meningococcal Vaccines for Preteens, Teens. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. http://www.cdc.gov/features/meningococcal/. Accessed June 2019.

[9] Thompson MJ, Ninis N, Perera R, et al. Clinical recognition of meningococcal disease in children and adolescents. Lancet. 2006;367(9508):397-403.

[10] Borg J, Christie D, Coen PG, Pooy R, Viner RM. Outcomes of meningococcal disease in adolescence: prospective, matched-cohort study. Pediatrics. 2009;123:e502-e509.

[11] Sabatini C, Bosis S, Semino M, Senatore L, Principi N, Esposito S. Clinical presentation of meningococcal disease in childhood. J Prev Med Hyg. 2012;53:116-119.

[12] Recommended Child and Adolescent Immunization Schedule for ages 18 years or younger. US Department of Health and Human Services. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/schedules/downloads/child/0-18yrs-child-combined-schedule.pdf. Accessed June 2019.