Chrysler Brand and National PTA Collaborate to Support Schools with ‘Cars 4 Classrooms’ Program

(Sponsored Post) Chrysler minivans have been the go-to vehicle for families with school-aged children for more than 30 years.

Families have come to rely on the functionality and versatility offered by Chrysler minivans to transport children safely to and from school along with the available cargo space to haul bulky science projects, sports gear or fundraising items.

This relationship between Chrysler and schools in our communities is expanding after the brand became a Proud National Sponsor of National PTA last year.

Through this collaboration between Chrysler and National PTA, the brand will support local PTAs across the country in promoting family engagement in education and raising funds for their schools.

The brand’s efforts to support schools across the country will be showcased at every Cars 4 Classrooms fundraising event. PTAs and schools have an opportunity to set up test drive fundraising events through this initiative that feature the Chrysler Pacifica and Chrysler Pacifica Hybrid to earn up to $3,000 for their school.

The featured vehicle for this program, the Chrysler Pacifica, represents the sixth generation of Chrysler minivan. The Pacifica is completely re-engineered from the ground up on an all-new platform and offers the first hybrid minivan to the segment. It also has more than 100 available safety and security features, the class-exclusive Uconnect Theater rear-seat entertainment system, and an array of comfort and convenience technologies.

For every participant who takes a Pacifica for a brief test drive as part of this program, the brand will donate $10 to the school. PTAs can go to http://www.Cars4classrooms.comto learn more about hosting an event. Participating Chrysler franchised dealerships will work with PTAs to provide Chrysler Pacifica minivans for the event.

In addition to the test drive fundraiser, the Chrysler brand will support PTAs in encouraging families to visit their child’s school and get more involved in their education as part of National PTA’s Take Your Family to School Week Feb. 11-17, 2018.

What Do Successful Schools Look Like?

As a parent, I have a good idea of how my child’s school is working for her. I talk to her and her friends about what is going on there. I see the work that she is doing. I communicate with her teachers and other school staff.

But while I know that my daughter is at a school that’s good for her, it’s harder to figure out whether it’s a successful school overall. Is her school helping each of its students reach their fullest potential? What does such a school look like?

The Learning First Alliance, which includes organizations like National PTA and whose members collectively represent more than 10 million educators, parents and local policymakers, have pulled together to research and answer that question.

The result of that effort is “The Elements of Success: 10 Million Speak on Schools That Work,” an anthology that identifies six elements that are common to all successful schools. It also makes clear that there is no one model for a successful school—in each success story, educators, parents and local communities have developed programs specific to their goals and challenges, within their communities’ setting.

While all successful schools share the six elements, how they are implemented and integrated depends greatly on context. The elements are:

  • Focus on the Total Child: Successful schools support all students’ needs—inside and outside the classroom—to help them become effective, empowered learners. They design and carry out programs that offer all students a rich educational experience, supporting their academic and social/emotional learning and physical development.
  • Commitment to Equity and Access: Successful schools ensure all students have access to high-quality services and support systems, enabling them to set and reach high goals for learning. In them, equity does not mean equality; they recognize some students need additional resources to have the same opportunity for success as others. They also recognize diversity is a strength.
  • Family and Community Engagement: Successful schools effectively engage families and communities in support of students. In doing so, they identify barriers to such engagement and work to overcome them.
  • Distributed Leadership: Successful schools define leadership broadly. Leadership is distributed among principals, teachers, parents, community members and others in the building, and decision-making is a shared endeavor.
  • Strong, Supported Teaching Force and Staff: Successful schools are staffed with educators—including teachers, principals, school counselors, technology specialists and others—who are well-educated, well-prepared and well-supported. These educators meet high standards of practice, and they benefit from continuous learning opportunities.
  • Relationship-Oriented School Climate: Successful schools create a culture of collaboration and shared responsibility among staff and students and with families and communities. These schools are safe, welcoming and respectful to all.

These elements are all widely known. But two things make this collection of research unique. One is consensus. “The Elements of Success: 10 Million Speak on Schools That Work” does not reflect the expertise of one individual or one organization. It reflects the collective wisdom of all the various public-school interest groups—parents, teachers, administrators and more. Together, they agree these are the elements needed for a school to perform at a high level.

The second is the emphasis on interactions. A school with good teachers and poor leadership won’t be successful. Nor will a school with strong leadership and teachers that focuses solely on test scores. The interaction between all six of these elements is critical.

So how can parents and PTAs use this information? One idea is to use this research as a conversation starter. Bring parents, teachers, administrators and others in the school community together to honestly assess where you are in terms of each of these six elements. Identify your strengths and where additional support is needed. Then work together to make sure your school is meeting the needs of every child who attends.

The report and supporting materials are available at LearningFirst.org/ElementsOfSuccess.

Anne O’Brien is Deputy Director at the Learning First Alliance.